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Exploring Economic Prosperity for Aboriginal Peoples webinar

1-2pm, 5 November 2020

REGISTRATION COMING SOON

This is the next webinar in a series sharing the learnings and findings from our research agenda

Agreement-making is at the heart of OCHRE — the NSW Government’s community focused-plan for Aboriginal Affairs which is committed to transforming the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Government.

As the fourth pillar of our democracy, media plays a central role in providing the public with information, creating public awareness and shaping public opinion. Media provide the conditions that support or hinder open, respectful and well-informed discussions about agreement making with Aboriginal communities. The individuals and institutions that government seeks advice from including Ministers, public officials, industry bodies and researchers are not immune to the discourses.

A University of Technology Sydney study examined 45 years of news media reporting of Aboriginal efforts for self-determination, rights and agreements. Amy Thomas, lead study author, will present this webinar alongside Rachael Hocking, a Warlpiri woman with roots in the Tanami Desert of the Northern Territory, and NITV reporter and presenter.

About the research:

Released in early 2020, Does the media fail Aboriginal political aspirations? 45 years of news media reporting of key political moments reviews mainstream print media of 11 key moments in Aboriginal political life, finding approaches to telling stories that range from sympathetic stalling to patronising parodies. The study was conducted by Amy Thomas, Professor Heidi Norman, and Professor Andrew Jakubowicz, with contributions from Lorena Allam, Alison Whittaker, Amy McQuire and Dr Anne Maree Payne. It was commissioned by Aboriginal Affairs NSW as part of the OCHRE commitment, which aims to fundamentally change the relationship between government and Aboriginal communities, from unilaterialism to bi/multi-lateralism. By understanding how the media has engaged with Aboriginal political aspirations over time, we can better understand how to shift public dialogue and achieve meaningful agreements between Aboriginal peoples and government.

Exploring Economic Prosperity for Aboriginal Peoples webinar

Thursday 15 October 2020

Watch again here

This was the first in a series of free webinars to share the learnings and findings from our research agenda.

The terms economic development, wellbeing and prosperity are used in very different ways and profoundly shape the relationships between Indigenous polities, the State and diverse publics. They also influence policy frameworks and have very real impacts on First Peoples’ lives and institutions.

This webinar explored how economic development, wellbeing and prosperity are defined and operationalised in the literature and in public policy within Australia and also internationally before considering an Indigenous-informed approach to Indigenous prosperity to inform economic prosperity for Aboriginal Peoples in New South Wales in future work.

Presenters:

  • Professor Tony Dreise, Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), Australian National University
  • Dr Mandy Yap, CAEPR, Australian National University
  • Dr Annick Thomassin, CAEPR, Australian National University



Charles Sturt University host the ‘Aboriginal research for our time’ seminar in Dubbo

On 23 October 2018, Charles Sturt University, Dubbo hosted the last of four research seminars planned for 2018. Over 80 students, academics, policymakers, practitioners, and community members interested in Aboriginal affairs policy reform in NSW heard about some of the areas of research that Aboriginal Affairs NSW will be exploring.

To a full house, Andrea Kelly’s keynote address highlighted the importance listening and truth telling on the road to reconciliation. Aunty Di McNaboe, Connie Ah See, Julie Blackhall, Sam Jeffries and Des Jones added local knowledge and wisdom to the presentations and subsequent deliberations.


Southern Cross University host the ‘Aboriginal research for our time’ seminar in Lismore

On 26 July 2018, Southern Cross University, Lismore hosted the third of four seminars planned for 2018. Over 130 students, academics, policymakers, practitioners, and community members interested in Aboriginal affairs policy reform in NSW heard about some of the areas of research that Aboriginal Affairs NSW will be exploring.

To a full house, Dr Chris Sarra’s keynote address highlighted the importance of acknowledging and embracing Indigenous leadership in communities. Other highlights included the discussion between Dr Gabrielle Russell-Mundine and Wahlabul and Bundjalung community members of what it means to be a culturally capable public servant, the conversation between Jason Ardler and Jeff McMullen about the impact of then negative public discourse about Aboriginal peoples and the impact of Aboriginal perspectives on policy development, Professor Heidi Norman’s presentation on the return of public lands to Aboriginal control/ownership, and the discussion between Anthony Seiver and Callum Clayton-Dixon about the revival of Aboriginal languages.

Bring us policy approaches that nurture hope

NSW Listening to Aboriginal Voices


The Australian National host the ‘Aboriginal research for our time’ seminar in Canberra

On 11 April 2018, the Australian National University, Canberra hosted the second of four seminars planned for 2018. Bringing together the key contributors to the Aboriginal Affairs NSW research agenda, the seminar provided an opportunity for students, academics, policymakers, practitioners, and community members interested in Aboriginal affairs policy reform in NSW to hear about the policy and research findings of their work and to discuss research implications. To a full house the CEO of the Australian institute of Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander Studies Craig Richie’s keynote address made the case of research informed policy.

Good policy is transformative and liberating

The University of Technology host the ‘Aboriginal research for our time’ seminar in Sydney

On 1 March 2018, the University of Technology, Sydney hosted the first of four seminars planned for 2018. Bringing together the key contributors to the Aboriginal Affairs NSW research agenda, the seminar provided an opportunity for students, academics, policymakers, practitioners, and community members interested in Aboriginal affairs policy reform in NSW to hear about the policy and research findings of their work and to discuss research implications. To a full house Mick Gooda’s keynote address reminded us that research is our friend.
Research is your friend


The Hon. Sarah Mitchell MLC launches research agenda

On 28 February 2018 the Honourable Sarah Mitchell MLC, Minister for Aboriginal affairs launched the Aboriginal Affairs NSW research agenda at Parliament House. In conversation with Jeff McMullen AM, Jason Ardler the Head of Aboriginal Affairs, and Aunty Jean Hands the Chair of the Northern Rivers Regional Alliance and the NSW Chairs of Aboriginal Regional Alliances spoke about the their desire for a new narrative in Aboriginal affairs. Particular attention was given to the critical role of the extended research community in delivering the evidence that supports Aboriginal communities and the NSW Government to work together to determine what works, what’s worth trying and what success looks like.

Research needs to deliver the information needed



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