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A three way relationship: both sides of politics & Aboriginal communities

On 6 November, 2016, Brett Tibbett, a Gumbaynggirr man, talks about his experiences and reflections on working with the New South Wales government to make sure the services and programs in the Aboriginal communities he represents are what the communities need. Brett calls for a three way relationship: both sides of politics and Aboriginal communities. Brett is the Chair of the Regional Aboriginal Development Alliance covering the Ballina, Byron, Clarence Valley, Kyogle, Lismore, Richmond Valley and Tweed local government areas.

Be open and honest and do not make promises you can not keep

On 6 November, 2016, Ruth Davys, a Wiradjuri woman talks about her experiences and reflections on working with the New South Wales government to make sure the services and programs in the Aboriginal communities she represents are what the communities want. Ruth draws our attention to need for change in the relationship between the New South Wales government and Aboriginal communities to one that is open and honest. Ruth is the Chair of the Riverina-Murray Regional Alliance that covers the New South Wales areas of Albury, Cootamundra, Cummeragunja, Deniliquin, Griffith, Hay, Leeton, Narrandera, Tumut, and Wagga.

Be upfront and honest

On 18 October, 2016, Aunty Jean Hands, a Kamilaroi woman, reflects on her time as Chair of the Northern Regional Aboriginal Alliance and what it means for her to represent Aboriginal communities in getting the services and programs communities want. Aunty Jean call for relationships that are upfront and honest. The Northern Regional Aboriginal Alliance in located in Northern New South Wales and covers the local government areas of Armidale Dumaresq, Glen Innes Severn, Gunnedah, Guyra, Inverell, Liverpool Plains, Muswellbrook, Singleton, Tamworth Regional, Tenterfield, Upper Hunter, Uralla, Walcha and Warrumbungle.

Changing the way government does business with us

On 7 November, 2016, Sam Jeffries, a Murrawarri man and outgoing Chairperson of the Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly in Far Western New South Wales talks about his experiences working with the New South Wales government make sure the services and programs in the Aboriginal communities he represents are what the communities need. He reflects that government needs to changing the way does business with his community. The Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly represents the interests of Aboriginal people across the communities of Gulargambone, Coonamble, Walgett, Collarenebri, Lightning Ridge, Goodooga, Weilmoringle, Brewarrina, Enngonia, Bourke, Cobar, Wilcannia, Broken Hill, Menindee, Ivanhoe, and Dareton/Wentworth.

Investing in Aboriginal community capacity and jobs

On 7 November, 2016, Sam Jeffries, a Murrawarri man and outgoing Chairperson of the Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly in Far Western New South Wales talks about investing in and developing the capacity of Aboriginal communities and employment. The Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly represents the interests of Aboriginal people across the communities of Gulargambone, Coonamble, Walgett, Collarenebri, Lightning Ridge, Goodooga, Weilmoringle, Brewarrina, Enngonia, Bourke, Cobar, Wilcannia, Broken Hill, Menindee, Ivanhoe, and Dareton/Wentworth.

It's about changing the future not for ourselves but our future generations

On 18 October, 2016, Geoff Maher, a Gumbaynggirr and Biripi man and Chairperson of the Illawarra and Wingecarribee Regional Partnership Alliance in the Illawarra South East region of New South Wales in Australia, talks about his experiences and reflections about working with the New South Wales Government to make sure the services and programs in the Aboriginal communities he represents are what the communities need. The Illawarra and Wingecarribee Regional Partnership Alliance operates in the Wingecarribee, Kiama, Shellharbour and Wollongong local council areas.

Real conversations about real things

On 18 October, 2016, Michele Donovan, a Gumbaynggirr woman, talks about her experiences and reflections about working with the New South Wales government to make sure the services and programs in the Aboriginal communities she represents are what the communities need. Michelle calls for real conversations about issues that are important to the community she represents. Michelle is the Chair of the Tribal Wave Regional Assembly covering the Bellingen, Coffs Harbour, Gloucester, Greater Taree, Kempsey, Nambucca and Port Macquarie-Hastings, Williamtown, Medowie and Karuah local government areas.

A summary of self-determination – history, interpretation an research gaps

On 1 March, 2018, Associate Professor Janet Hunt summarises the history of in New South Wales and nationally, the ways it has been interpreted and research gaps in the area.

Watch on Filmpond here

Mechanisms and challenges for self-determination

On 11 April 2018, in discussing the current self-determination landscape in NSW and Australia Associate Professor Janet Hunt reminds us that self-determination is both an inherent and collective right. Associate Professor Hunt describes the main approaches used including the Indigenous community sector model, nation building and treaty making. She challenges us to better understand the aspirations of Aboriginal people for self-determination and the mechanisms and processes required to exercise their collective right across the very diverse contexts of NSW.

Watch on Filmpond here

Releasing the better angels - treaty and recognition

In February 2018, Jeff McMullen AM, and Jason Ardler the Head of Aboriginal Affairs NSW talk about the impact of colonisation on Aboriginal people’s connection to their Country and the importance of this connection to belonging. They discuss how legal recognition could finish the unfinished business that started with colonisation.

Watch on Filmpond here

What would self-determination look like in 2018?

In February 2018, Jeff McMullen AM and Jason Ardler the Head of Aboriginal Affairs NSW talk about self-determination, the assumptions we make about it and the implications of imposing these without dialogue with Aboriginal peoples.

Watch on Filmpond here